Young shoppers more likely to buy ethically than older consumers

Under-35s are also twice as likely to use butchers and greengrocers than traditional supermarkets, say IGD ShopperVista

Over the next year, under-35s are also twice as likely (23%) than over-35s to say they will buy more organic over the next year

Under-35s are twice as likely (23%) than over-35s to say they will buy more organic over the next year

Shoppers aged under-35 are more likely than their older counterparts to shop ethically, according to research from IGD ShopperVista.

The study also revealed that young consumers are more likely than over-35s to cook from scratch and are more than twice as likely to think they will be better off in the year ahead.

The news follows research from earlier in November by Mintel for Sainsbury’s, which found that despite the recession, consumers are putting more consideration into household spending.

Shopping behaviour

Sainsbury’s Brand director, Judith Batchelar believes this has triggered “new fashioned values” including positive shopping behaviour.

“By having to make considered choices, people are rediscovering the shopping and cooking habits of previous generations.

“Whether they are adapting by planning weekly meals, being creative with leftovers, or preparing more packed lunches, they are finding a new sense of satisfaction and pleasure from being savvy shoppers,” she said.

Similarly, the IGD research found that under-35s are twice as likely to want to use butchers and greengrocers more in the future – with this figure standing at 18% against 9% of over-35s.

Young people want to ‘do the right thing’

Over the next year, under-35s are also twice as likely (23%) than over-35s to say they will buy more organic over the next year.

Joanne Denney-Finch, chief executive at IGD, believes the fact that the under-35 generation have grown up with high profile ethical campaigns by celebrity chefs along with the advent of cheaper international travel has helped.

“Shoppers under-35 are  more interested in supporting workers in developing nations, through Fairtrade for example, and considering a retailer’s values and approach to sourcing products.

“As well as wanting to do the right thing, younger people are more interested in cooking from scratch, using leftovers to waste less, and spending a little more on food and drink to make a nice meal or have a treat if they have spare money at the end of the month,” she said.

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