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BT announce price hikes — What can consumers do?

Following recent price hikes from Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media, BT has announced its own set of price increases across the board. If you’re a BT customer or subscribe to BT Sport, read on to find out what your rights are.

Just six months after their last price increase and for the third time in 18 months, BT is raising prices.

Across the board, broadband and landline prices are increasing, and BT TV customers will soon be charged for BT Sport — a service that was previously free — just in time for the new football season. Sky subscribers who also pay for BT Sport will see price increases to their BT Sport packages, too.

Changes coming into effect 2 April

Broadband

The monthly price of copper — also called ADSL — broadband will increase by £2.

BT Infinity fibre broadband prices will go up by £2.50 per month.

Landlines

BT’s anytime calls plan will increase by 49p per month while evening and weekend call plans will increase by 30p per month.

Regardless of your plan, calls charged per minute will increase by 1p per minute, and call setup fees will increase by 2p.

Some calling features like Call Minder will also increase by up to 25p per month.

BT Sport

Sky subscribers will be the first to see BT Sport price increases. For those who have Sky TV and BT broadband, monthly fees for BT Sport will increase by £1.50.

For Sky subscribers without BT broadband, the monthly charge for BT sport will increase by £1.

Changes coming into effect 1 August

The last increase will hit BT TV customers this summer in line with the new football season.

BT TV customers on certain packages will start paying £3.50 per month — or £42 per year — for BT Sport.

These charges will affect subscribers to BT’s Entertainment Starter and Entertainment Plus packages; however, Total Entertainment or Entertainment Max customers will not be subject to these charges.

BT TV customers can opt out of BT Sport as well to avoid paying these additional charges.

What can customers do?

If you’re a BT customer, you don’t have to idly sit by while your bills increase. Now is the time to look at switching providers.

Under Ofcom regulations, you’re allowed to break your contract, penalty-free, if a provider increases your monthly subscription price from what was agreed at the point of sale.

Once you receive your notice from BT that prices will increase, you have 30 days in which you can switch providers without paying any fees, even if you’re in the middle of your contract.

Compare popular broadband deals and find out what’s available in your area, or check out cheap broadband deals.

To learn more about how you can start the switching process, read our guide on switching broadband providers.

Contacting BT

Although switching providers sends a strong message, you might want to stay with BT if you’re otherwise happy with your service — but that doesn’t mean you can’t voice your complaints.

Customers can contact BT in several ways:

  • Phone: BT’s customer care line can be reached at 0800 800 150, and it’s open Monday to Friday, 8am to 8pm, or weekends from 9am to 6pm.
  • E-mail: You can fill out BT’s contact form and submit your complaint. BT aims to respond to e-mails within 24 hours.
  • Live chat: BT support assistants are available via live chat from 7am to 11pm every day.
  • Twitter: The @BTCare Twitter account is very responsive to public complaints on social media.

Regardless of how you choose to respond to the latest price increases, you have the option to speak up — either with your words or your wallet — and let BT know you’re unhappy with these changes.