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Amazon is clamping down on video pirates, banning streaming devices that enable buyers to watch illegally available content.

While Amazon hasn't made an official announcement on the matter, it is "drawing a line" under the sale of Kodi-style boxes that encourage piracy.

The restricted products section of Amazon's selling guidelines page spells out the firm's stance.

"Products offered for sale on Amazon should not promote, suggest the facilitation of, or actively enable the infringement of or unauthorised access to digital media or other protected content," it says. "Any streaming media player or other device that violates this policy is prohibited from sale on Amazon."

It goes on to state that it is the seller's responsibility not to sell these types of players. If you do, Amazon "may immediately suspend or terminate your selling privileges and destroy inventory in our fulfilment centres without reimbursement."

Payments and remittances may also be withheld or forfeited, it adds.

The best-known of this new crop of piracy-enabled streaming boxes is the Kodi box. Kodi is open-source software that can be tweaked to let viewers illegally stream copyrighted material, like Premiership football matches. Some retailers even sell them pre-loaded with the necessary software (so-called 'fully loaded' boxes), so buyers can just fire them up and start watching.

Recently, the Premier League won a landmark ruling which should help combat the problem. Previously, it could only block individual streams, which would be replaced straight away by other streams. But thanks to the recent ruling, the English Premier League can request internet service providers to block the computer servers hosting these streams, thereby tackling the problem at source.

One man was recently given a suspended prison sentence and fined £250,000 for selling fully-loaded Kodi boxes.

Owning a Kodi box isn't illegal in itself, but certain uses of them are.

Source: The Inquirer

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