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Glasgow to provide funding to create energy efficient homes

Up to £1,200 on offer for residents looking to install energy efficient systems

Homes in Glasgow are being offered grants to help with the installation of green energy technology which could save millions on utility bills. The initiative is the brainchild of a partnership between the Scottish government and the Energy Saving Trust.

The fund has been set up to allow residents to apply for a grant that would contribute towards a new boiler, better insulation or other energy saving solutions.

Under the Green Homes
Cashback scheme, each household within the city could be eligible for a handout of £1,200. It is open to both homeowners and those who rent from a landlord.

Overall, it is thought that residents will save a collective £49 million per year by making their homes more energy efficient.

Heating that does not cost the earth is ‘a fundamental right’

Scottish energy minister Fergus Ewing has praised the project, stating that it is a fundamental right of every person in Scotland to live in a home that can be properly and economically heated throughout the winter months.

“In these current economic times, it is more important than ever that people take advantage of money-saving opportunities,” Mr Ewing added.

A ‘greener’ Scotland

Mike Thornton, director of the Energy Saving Trust in Scotland, underlined that it was not just about saving money for consumers, but also about making Scotland a better and greener place in the long term.

This latest project comes just weeks after Glasgow City Council said that it was looking to tackle fuel poverty in the city by setting up its own energy company.

Glasgow Energy Services Company would create a range of renewable installations across the city, with excess energy sold back to the National Grid, and this cash used to help tackle any shortfalls that Glasgow residents have with regards to their energy bills in the future.

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