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Broadband providers BT and TalkTalk have been granted permission to appeal the judicial review of the Digital Economy Act.

Earlier this year, the High Court sided with the government over the controversial legislation, which imposes responsibilities on broadband providers to combat copyright infringement.

BT and TalkTalk have been two of the legislation's most vociferous critics, due to both the requirements of the act and the way in which it was passed.

The Digital Economy Act entered the statute books in May 2010 in the dying days of Gordon Brown's Labour government, without a full parliamentary debate.

Mike O'Connor, Chief Executive of Consumer Focus, welcomed the court's decision to give permission to an appeal.

"Our concern is that Digital Economy Act takes a hard-line enforcement approach and could lead to entire households being disconnected from the internet based on accusations by copyright owners," he stated.

"Copyright infringement is a problem but we need more innovation and competition to encourage consumers to use legal online music and film services."

Mr O'Connor said that in light of the ongoing judicial process, the government should reconsider whether implementation of the act is the best way to tackle online copyright infringement.

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