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TalkTalk has incurred the wrath of the advertising regulator after its online speed checker was found to offer potentially misleading information.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) upheld a customer complaint over the website tool, after concluding that consumers were likely to receive speeds lower than those estimated.

The individual was informed by TalkTalk that his estimated speed range was between 2.1Mb and 5.3Mb, reports ISPreview.co.uk.

However he had previously been informed that the maximum speeds available through his connection were 2.1Mb.

"In the context of the understanding we considered was likely to be taken from the ad, we expected to see evidence to demonstrate that the speed checker accurately reflected the throughput speeds consumers received in the majority of cases," the ASA stated.

"We noted TalkTalk had submitted data they believed demonstrated the accuracy of the speed checker. We also noted, however, that the data did not include information about the speeds that were estimated for those consumers in order to allow a comparison that demonstrated that the speed checker accurately reflected the throughput speeds consumers received."

The ASA said some speed issues experienced by consumers could relate to their own particular circumstances and, to that end, the complainant's issue might be a customer service one, rather than an indication of the general reliability of the line checker.

"However, because we had not seen directly relevant evidence to support the impression that was likely to be taken from the ad - that the speed checker was indicative of the likely actual throughput speeds consumers would achieve in the majority of cases - we concluded that the ad breached the code," the regulator stated.

TalkTalk has been instructed not to use its download speed checker again in its existing form.

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